What makes a good haiga?

I’ve been thinking about what makes a good haiga.

collage_20150629173226267_20150629173310322 (2)

“Haiga, like haiku itself, became a major form of artistic expression with Matsuo Basho (1644–1694). His modest paintings do not seek to impress viewers with technical prowess, bright colors, or bold brushwork, but they set the tone for most haiga that was to follow. The most important later poet-artist was Yosa Buson (1716–1784) who was a master painter. Some of his scrolls go beyond the simplicity and modesty established by Basho, turning haiga into a more purely painterly medium.”  http://happyhaiku.blogspot.com.au/2005/11/shahai.html

Basho_Horohoroto

Haiga by Basho – calligraphy reads –

                                     Yellow rose petals

                                           thunder—

                                         a waterfall

  image source – http://thephilosophersmail.com/virtues/the-great-eastern-philosophers-matsuo-basho/

“While the haiku and the painting in a haiga share the same space, they are meant to complement, and not explain, one another.  In fact, in some cases the haiku and the painting have nothing to do with one another, because, explains Takiguchi, “if the painting and haiku are [similar], it would mean that one has been added because the other is not adequate.” https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/text/haiga-haiku-calligraphy-and-painting

Haiga by Buson – calligraphy reads

             willow leaves fallen
in the stream-bed dry rocks
helter skelter

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